Seasonal Musings 2020

General TSP Discussion.

Moderator: Aitrus

Kal1981
Posts: 37
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2020 8:12 pm

Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Aitrus, thanks for sharing your insights. So you don’t use any kind of TA to see if seasonality is strong for the monthly transfer? I’m asking because the TSPCalc FB group looks at moving averages, etc to see if seasonality is strong for an IFT but I’ve always thought of seasonality as a “period” rather then identifying a specific “day” to IFT.
Aitrus wrote:Kal1981,

126743 looks to be a nice little improvement on Jahby's. Kudos on working that out. It's not something I can track normally because 1) TSPcalc's dataset doesn't go back as far as mine does and 2) the dataset I use can't do 50/50 mixes very well. Still, it's an intriguing setup.

As for the 200 SMA, no I don't use this. However, I will likely go through the painstaking process of calculating by hand the results of that particular Mix as part of the end of year report in order to help provide context to the wider picture.

From what I've been able to tell, the 1990 - 2010 period was one of slow-but-steady growth in the economy overall. The dot-com bust in 2000 and the housing crisis in 2008 certainly didn't help matters much, either. The rise of the Alphabet stocks since 2010 has played a big role in the market's performance since 2010, as well as other issues (both political as well as not).

I don't think it has anything to do with seasonal tendencies. There hasn't been a major shift in our economic model as happened in the past. Pre WWII, we were an agriculture-based economy that favored the summer/fall period and winter was the worst time. It was actually a time when "buy in May, sell in November" was a better investing strategy.

Post WWII, we became a manufacturing-based economy, which turned things on their heads a little. Summer became the lag season because of the uncertainty of knowing how well the various sectors performed until annual reports came out at the end of the fiscal year.

Which brings us to now. We still have agriculture and we still have manufacturing, but we are mostly a service and fossil fuels-based economy now - and have been since the '80s. That hasn't changed. The only thing that's changed is that medicine and technology are playing a bigger part, but the cyclic nature of the seasonality trends already in place are still pretty much intact. The invention of fracking has allowed us to become energy independent and use a cleaner means of producing, and that's suppressing the oil prices but helping to boost other sectors of the economy. Summer seems to be picking up more nowadays because the rise of healthcare and technology seems to have a bright spot now and then, but it's not enough to significantly change the big picture.

Check out these charts to get a better picture of what I mean when I say that summertime is still the doldrums of the year, and why I don't that seasonality is the reason why performance has changed from 1990 - 2020 and 2020 - present.

Equity Clock: Seasonality - http://www.equityclock.com/seasonality/

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

Kal1981 wrote:Aitrus, thanks for sharing your insights. So you don’t use any kind of TA to see if seasonality is strong for the monthly transfer? I’m asking because the TSPCalc FB group looks at moving averages, etc to see if seasonality is strong for an IFT but I’ve always thought of seasonality as a “period” rather then identifying a specific “day” to IFT.
I personally don't, no. I learned long ago that as soon as I start down the Tech Analysis path, my emotions start getting involved in my thinking process for some reason. I get hopeful when I think I see something good (but it actually isn't), or I get fearful when I think I see something bad (but it's actually a good sign instead). I don't understand TA well enough to read the signals, and goodness knows I've tried learning it. It just doesn't work for me.

However, there are a lot of people who use seasonality as a sort of weather vane, and combine it with TA to make their moves. If it works well for them, then I say congrats and urge them to continue using it.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

I just realized that I neglected to post the November results. Must be getting old or something...

Seasonal Strategy Results for November 2019

Note: A "good" month for the F Fund is CAGR 0.5% or better, and PNR 70% or better. A "good" month for C, S and I Funds is CAGR 1% or better, and PNR 70% or better. See 2nd post in the thread for description of CAGR. PNR is the ratio of Positive Months to Negative Months.

General Funds
G Fund:
0.07%, 0.91% Year to Date (YTD), PNR remains 100%
Nov Total CAGR = 0.0.36%
Nov 20 year CAGR = 0.24%
Nov 10 year CAGR = 0.16%
Nov 5 year CAGR = 0.16%
12-month PIP: 1.05%
2019’s return: 0.14%

November is normally a one of the worst months of the year for the G Fund, but this was worse than normal – just like the rest of the year. This has been the worst year on record for the G Fund by far.

F Fund: 0.99%, 7.36% YTD
Nov Total CAGR = 0.37%, PNR 61%
Nov 20 year CAGR = 0.24%, PNR 55%
Nov 10 year CAGR = -0.06%, PNR 50%
Nov 5 year CAGR = -0.19%, PNR 20%
12-month PIP: 7.27%
2019’s return: -0.05%

November is usually a bad performer for the F Fund, but this year was better than normal. This was the best return since 2009 for the bond-based Fund. Of note: over the past few years there has been a lot of naysaying about the F Fund, largely due to the acts of the Federal Reserve. However, if the F Fund has a normal December, it will end up finishing somewhere between 7.5 – 8.5%. Since 2002 (the last double-digit year for the F Fund at 10.27%), there has been only three other years that were over 7%: 2019 (8.68%), 2011 (7.89%), and 2007 (7.08%). It’s not often that the F Fund performs this well – much less two years in a row. Keep in mind that the long term 1988 – 2019 CAGR for the F Fund is 6.12%, so the Fund is outperforming right now. Despite all the Federal Reserve’s tinkering with the interest rate, I think the F Fund is alive and well. And given G Fund’s performance of late, I view this as a very good thing.

C Fund: 10.95%, 13.94% YTD
Nov Total CAGR = 1.96%, PNR 76%
Nov 20 year CAGR = 2.36%, PNR 85%
Nov 10 year CAGR = 2.94%, PNR 90%
Nov 5 year CAGR = 4.63%, PNR 100%
12-month PIP: 17.36%
2019’s return: 3.63%

The C Fund had a monster return for November 2020. This return was massive and is the single double-digit return for the Fund for the month of November. The next biggest return occurred in 2001 (7.62%).

S Fund: 18.26%, 22.95% YTD
Nov Total CAGR = 2.04%, PNR 76%
Nov 20 year CAGR = 3.13%, PNR 85%
Nov 10 year CAGR = 4.10%, PNR 90%
Nov 5 year CAGR = 6.96%, PNR 100%
12-month PIP: 25.59%
2019’s return: 4.54%

This was hands-down the biggest single-month return for the S Fund since 1988 – for any month you’d care to choose. And it just had another such performance: April 2020 returned 15.81%, and had set a new record back then as well. It’s a very good thing that these two months happened together in 2020 to make up for the massive hits that were taken in Feb and Mar, which together hit for -29.41%.

I Fund: 15.54%, 3.36% YTD
Nov Total CAGR = 0.57%, PNR 61%
Nov 20 year CAGR = 1.19%, PNR 65%
Nov 10 year CAGR = 1.49%, PNR 60%
Nov 5 year CAGR = 2.94%, PNR 60%
12-month PIP: 6.72%
2019’s return: 1.15%

The I Fund is usually hit-and-miss in November, particularly over the past decade or so, with the average resulting in lower returns than an investor would normally like to see. 2020’s return, however, was a much-needed shot in the arm, enough to bring the I Fund into positive territory. If it holds on through December, it can perhaps salvage this ugly year. Like the C and S Funds, this return was much bigger than any investor would have a right to reasonably expect at this time of year. The return of 15.54% sets the record not only for November but is also the best return for any month going back to 1988. The next closest is October 1990 with 15.40%.

Currently Tracked Seasonal Strategies

Jahbulon's Basic Mix: C Fund in Nov (10.95%), 10.49% YTD, PIP 12.86%
gclapper’s M3 Mix: C Fund in Nov (10.95%), 0.96% YTD, PIP 3.13%
TSPCenter.com's Old Calculator: C Fund in Nov (10.95%), 18.20% YTD, PIP 20.74%
tmj100’s Mix: S Fund in Nov (18.26%), -0.57% YTD, PIP 1.57%
Boltman's Mix: S Fund in Nov (18.26%), 20.78% YTD, PIP 24.70%
Chindsey’s Mix #1: C Fund in Nov (10.95%), -4.32% YTD, PIP -2.27%
Sell in May and Go Away: C Fund in Nov (10.95%), -1.82% YTD, PIP 1.13%
G all year, S in Dec Mix: G Fund in Nov (0.07%), 0.90% YTD

Everybody in the C or S Funds made some huge gains this past month, with the result that a couple of Mixes went into double digits. A number of PIPs are well into double digits as well. If we have a normal December, everybody should see a nice pop upward in their returns to close out what has become a nice year of recovery after the Feb / March hits early in the year.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

For January 2021
Last chance to move: Thursday, 31 December before noon EST

For this coming January, the individual funds have performed on average as follows:

G Fund

Since 1988: 0.40%
Last 20 years: 0.27%
Last 10 years: 0.19%
Last 5 years: 0.20%

January is a so-so month for the G Fund. The 2020 return was 0.17%.

F Fund – A “good” month is a CAGR of 0.5% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.65%, PNR 79%
Last 20 years: CAGR 0.70%, PNR 85%
Last 10 years: CAGR 0.77%, PNR 80%
Last 5 years: CAGR 0.71%, PNR 80%

Over time, the consistency of returns for the F Fund in January seems to be pretty stable across all timeframe measurements. An investor could certainly make a worse choice during this time of year.

The best years were 2015 (2.13%), 1995 (1.98%) and 2020 (1.91%). The worst years were 1990 (-1.38%), 1992 (-1.35%) and 2018 (-1.14%).

C Fund
– A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.55%, PNR 58%
Last 20 years: CAGR -0.03%, PNR 50%
Last 10 years: CAGR 1.54%, PNR 60%
Last 5 years: CAGR 2.02%, PNR 60%

January is normally pretty ho-hum for the C Fund. Nothing special to see here – occasional good years, but enough bad years to result in just so-so CAGR and PNR numbers.

The best years were 2019 (8.01%), 1989 (7.14%) and 1997 (6.22%). The worst years were 2009 (-8.41%), 1990 (-6.59%) and 2008 (-5.98%).

S Fund – A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.92%, PNR 61%
Last 20 years: CAGR 0.56%, PNR 50%
Last 10 years: CAGR 1.83%, PNR 60%
Last 5 years: CAGR 1.35%, PNR 60%

The S Fund was once considered borderline “good” in January, especially back when I first started doing Seasonal Musings in 2015. However, after a few years, it’s become clear that the month isn’t all that reliable for long term returns. Like the C Fund, it has occasional good years, with enough bad returns to drag down the calculations enough that it’s become a risky choice to take.

The best years were 2019 (11.64%), 2012 (7.59%) and 2013 (6.96%). The worst years were 2016 (-8.72%), 1990 (-8.53%) and 2009 (-8.19%).

I Fund - A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR -0.54%, PNR 48%
Last 20 years: CAGR -0.77%, PNR 50%
Last 10 years: CAGR 1.47%, PNR 70%
Last 5 years: CAGR 1.12%, PNR 60%

Long term, the I Fund loses in January, but the last decade has been abnormally good for this sector of the market. I urge caution: remember, the Law of Averages works both ways.

The best years were 1994 (8.33%), 2018 (6.60%), and 2006 (6.14%). The worst years were 2009 (-11.93%), 2008 (-8.52%), and 2000 (-6.44%).

Note: For CAGR explanation, see 2nd post in the thread. PNR is the ratio of Positive Months vs Negative Months. A Fund that was positive in March for 4 out of 10 years would have a PNR of 40%.

Individual Seasonal Mix Allocations
Here is where the various seasonal mix allocations are going to for January 2021.


Jahbulon’s Basic Seasonal Mix: Move to the F Fund.
gclapper’s M3 Mix: Move to the F Fund
TSPCenter.com’s Old Calculator: Move to the F Fund.
tmj100’s Mix: Move to the F Fund.
Boltman’s Mix: Move to the F Fund.
Chindsey’s Mix #1: Move to the F Fund
Sell in May and Go Away: Remain in the C Fund.
G All Year, S in Dec: Move to the G Fund.

Unsurprisingly, all the non-benchmark Mixes run to the F Fund for January. The markets are just too unpredictable during the first month of the year.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

mgantt
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by mgantt »

Quick question guys. I m new to the game and started transferring as of the end of December going into the new year. I am following one of the mixes so that means I transfer once per month if I am reading right from past posts. The question is do I just do an IFT or do I have to do an Contribution Allocation. I am active Duty not GS or retired.

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

Welcome, mgantt.

Yes, the Mixes and results I discuss in this thread assume that you would transfer once a month if the strategy calls for it, that your Interfund Transfer (IFT) takes place on the last day at close of business, and assumes that the Contribution Allocations are also made alongside the IFT. It doesn't matter if you're AD, GS, ANG / Reserves, or retired - the system works the same for all.

How your results would differ is if your contribution allocation setting is something different than what the strategy calls for during a given time period. For example, if your current contribution allocation is set for the S Fund, but the strategy says it's time to be in the F Fund (and that's where your money is at), then your paycheck contributions are going into the wrong Fund if you're trying to stick 100% to the strategy. So most people do one of two things: they change their contribution allocation setting to match their IFT each time they make an IFT, or they just leave the contribution allocation setting at G and just move the money the next time it's IFT time.

A few members have said that they build up a stockpile of cash in the G Fund and wait for a downturn in the market and buy a bunch of shares at a discount. However, I ran a study on the idea a few years ago and concluded that it's more trouble than it's worth unless you're talking about a huge stockpile of cash in relation to the size of the account coupled with a huge dip in the market. The opportunity cost is just too high.

Also, a quick aside since you're new here and might not have caught on to the difference yet: the Seasonal Strategies and Mixes I discuss here are monthly ones. These are different than the ones you see people talking about in relation to TSPCalc.com. If somebody mentions a number like #130870 or something similar, they're referring to a seasonal strategy from that site. TSPCalc uses the same methodology I use here in this thread, except that it allows for more than one move per month to take advantage of the TSP's full IFT move allowance - it's a more complicated and active application of the Seasonal Strategy idea.

I keep this thread going as a sort of primer to help new members understand the method on a basic level, then they can apply that knowledge on a deeper level on TSPCalc if they so choose. The information here also helps those who don't follow a seasonal strategy per se, but they like to stay informed on what seasonal headwinds and tailwinds the market is experiencing at a given time.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

mgantt
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by mgantt »

Ah thank you. I am trying the mixes you mention at the bottom of you post like the Jahbulon’s Basic Seasonal Mix and what not. So for every month I have to change the IFT and the contribution allocation setting both to 100%

Kal1981
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Is the F fund still a good part of seasonality with the Fed printing like there’s no tomorrow? https://seekingalpha.com/article/439416 ... high-risks

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

Ok, time for an update. I'm nowhere near finishing the 2020 Round-up and Seasonal Musings 2021 beginning posts like I want to be. January is normally a relatively slow month for me, but life has been kicking me in the teeth lately and I haven't been able to devote the time to it that I usually can at the beginning of the year. I'll have to ask you guys to be patient with me a little longer. It's coming, I just don't want to give you a half-assed product. There's enough of that going on in the world.

In the meantime, February is right around the corner, and those who follow this thread and it's information are probably wondering when I'll post the Upcoming Month info for Feb. Since this kind of post is comparatively simple for me to do, here ya go.

For February 2021
Last chance to move: Friday, 29 January before noon EST

For this coming February, the individual funds have performed on average as follows:

G Fund

Since 1988: 0.36%
Last 20 years: 0.25%
Last 10 years: 0.17%
Last 5 years: 0.17%

Feb is one of the worst months of the year for the G Fund. The 2020 return was 0.13%.

F Fund – A “good” month is a CAGR of 0.5% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.32%, PNR 70%
Last 20 years: CAGR 0.42%, PNR 75%
Last 10 years: CAGR 0.27%, PNR 70%
Last 5 years: CAGR 0.43%, PNR 60%

The F Fund does mediocre in Feb, but it’s a safer bet in terms of PNR than most of the other choices at this time of year.

The best years were 1995 (2.38%), 2020 (1.82%) and 1993 (1.73%). The worst years were 1996 (-1.75%), 1999 (-1.74%) and 1994 (-1.72%).

C Fund – A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.25%, PNR 61%
Last 20 years: CAGR -0.46%, PNR 55%
Last 10 years: CAGR 1.37%, PNR 70%
Last 5 years: CAGR -1.08%, PNR 40%

Feb is normally a pretty “meh” month for the C Fund, but the last decade has been worse than usual – especially with 2020’s miserable return skewing the numbers.

The best years were 1998 (7.20%), 1991 (7.07%) and 2015 (5.75%). The worst years were 2009 (-10.64%), 2001 (-9.12%) and 2020 (-8.24%).

S Fund – A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.90%, PNR 61%
Last 20 years: CAGR -0.38%, PNR 55%
Last 10 years: CAGR 1.62%, PNR 80%
Last 5 years: CAGR -0.88%, PNR 60%

Of all the Funds the S Fund seems to have the best risk/return ratio in Feb over both the long- and short-term timeframes. The numbers are a bit hedgy and not as solid a fit into the “good month” stipulations as I’d like. Still, it’s better than the other alternatives, I think. The only other realistic choice is the F Fund, if only for the long term PNRs.

The best years were 2000 (15.55%), 1991 (9.10%) and 1998 (7.65%). The worst years were 2001 (-12.15%), 2009 (-10.22%) and 2020 (-8.01%).

I Fund - A “good” month is a CAGR of 1% or better, and a PNR of 70% or better.
Since 1988: CAGR 0.22%, PNR 58%
Last 20 years: CAGR -0.41%, PNR 55%
Last 10 years: CAGR 0.64%, PNR 60%
Last 5 years: CAGR -2.40%, PNR 40%

The I Fund does just kind of middling in Feb. Nothing really to be proud of, but not super negative, either. Pretty much a wash risk/reward wise.

The best years were 1994 (8.33%), 2018 (6.60%), and 2006 (6.14%). The worst years were 2009 (-11.93%), 2008 (-8.52%), and 2020 (-7.74%).

Note: For CAGR explanation, see 2nd post in the thread. PNR is the ratio of Positive Months vs Negative Months. A Fund that was positive in March for 4 out of 10 years would have a PNR of 40%.

Individual Seasonal Mix Allocations
Here is where the various seasonal mix allocations are going to for February 2021.


Jahbulon’s Basic Seasonal Mix: Move to the S Fund.
gclapper’s M3 Mix: Move to the S Fund
TSPCenter.com’s Seasonal Mix: Move to the G Fund.
tmj100’s Mix: Move to the C Fund.
Boltman’s Mix: Move to the F Fund.
Chindsey’s Mix #1: Move to the S Fund
Sell in May and Go Away: Remain in the C Fund.
G All Year, S in Dec: Remain in the G Fund.

Given the tendency of February to not have a clear-cut best option, the Mixes all take different paths. Not surprising, and there aren’t really any bad choices, but not really any good ones either. Each one is a gamble one way or another. For the C and S Funds, keep in mind that the Last 10 and Last 5 numbers are heavily influenced by the dismal 2020 returns.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

Kal1981
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Thanks for continuing to post this Aitrus!

Kal1981
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Aitrus, some comparison of the current market with the dot com bubble got me thinking about how well seasonality did in 1999-2001. Currently TSPCalc only goes back to 2004. Would you mind sharing the annual return for 1999, 2000, and 2001 from your tracking system? Or would you mind sharing the data? Thanks in advance.

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

Kal1981 wrote: Sat Jan 30, 2021 9:53 pm Aitrus, some comparison of the current market with the dot com bubble got me thinking about how well seasonality did in 1999-2001. Currently TSPCalc only goes back to 2004. Would you mind sharing the annual return for 1999, 2000, and 2001 from your tracking system? Or would you mind sharing the data? Thanks in advance.
No problem.

1999
G: 5.99%
F: -0.86%
C: 20.95%
S: 42.39%
I: 25.26%

2000
G: 6.42%
F: 11.65%
C: -9.14%
S: -15.78%
I: -15.20%

2001
G: 5.39%
F: 8.57%
C: -11.95%
S: -9.03%
I: -21.94%

2002
G: 4.99%
F: 10.27%
C: -22.04%
S: -18.14%
I: -15.96%

2003
G: 4.14%
F: 4.10%
C: 28.52%
S: 42.91%
I: 37.92%

Does this work, or did you need the figures broken down further?
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

Kal1981
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Thanks Aitrus. If it’s not too much work, just the annual returns on Jahbulons strategy? I wanted to compare how seasonal strategy fared compared to buy and hold during those years. Thanks in advance!

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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Aitrus »

Here ya go.

1999: 20.97%
2000: 20.22%
2001: 6.58%
2002: 0.60%
2003: 26.60%

For those years, Jahbulon's Basic Mix beat the C Fund 4 of 5 times (although 1999 was basically dead even) with a total of 68.63% better performance.

For the S Fund, Jahbulon's Basic Mix beat it 3 out of 5 times, with a total of 32.62% in higher earnings.

2002 was the fourth worst return since 1988 for Jahbulon's Basic, and 2001 was the seventh worst year.
Seasonal Musings 2021: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=18757
Recommended Reading: http://tspcenter.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=13474
"It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters" Epictetus

Kal1981
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Re: Seasonal Musings 2020

Post by Kal1981 »

Thank you sir! You’re a gentleman and a scholar.
Aitrus wrote: Sun Jan 31, 2021 4:22 pm Here ya go.

1999: 20.97%
2000: 20.22%
2001: 6.58%
2002: 0.60%
2003: 26.60%

For those years, Jahbulon's Basic Mix beat the C Fund 4 of 5 times (although 1999 was basically dead even) with a total of 68.63% better performance.

For the S Fund, Jahbulon's Basic Mix beat it 3 out of 5 times, with a total of 32.62% in higher earnings.

2002 was the fourth worst return since 1988 for Jahbulon's Basic, and 2001 was the seventh worst year.

Post Reply

Fund Prices2021-04-13

FundPriceDayYTD
G $16.56 0.00% 0.33%
F $20.63 0.24% -2.65%
C $61.91 0.33% 10.73%
S $82.51 0.51% 11.20%
I $37.56 0.28% 6.13%
L2065 $13.54 0.34% 9.12%
L2060 $13.54 0.34% 9.12%
L2055 $13.54 0.34% 9.12%
L2050 $27.70 0.30% 7.33%
L2045 $12.66 0.28% 6.87%
L2040 $46.29 0.26% 6.44%
L2035 $12.25 0.24% 5.93%
L2030 $40.88 0.22% 5.43%
L2025 $11.64 0.17% 4.30%
Linc $22.75 0.09% 2.13%

Pending Allocations

Under development. For now, you may view Pending Allocations by going to "fantasy TSP" and selecting "Leaderboard sort" of "Pending Allocations".

What else

"Don't ever half-ass two things. Whole-ass one thing."
- Ron Swanson